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WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump plans to sign an executive order Wednesday directing his interior secretary to review the designation of tens of millions of acres of land as "national monuments," an action that could upend protections put in place in Utah and other states as Trump tries to rack up accomplishments in his first 100 days.

The Antiquities Act of 1906 authorizes the president to declare federal lands as monuments and restrict how the lands can be used.

"The executive order will direct me as the secretary to review prior monument designations and to suggest legislative changes or modifications to the monuments," Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke told reporters at the White House Tuesday evening.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) - One of North America's most prominent powwows is set to begin in New Mexico in the wake of pipeline protests in North Dakota that became a historic display of Native American solidarity.

The Gathering of Nations is one of the world's largest gatherings of indigenous people. Last year's event attracted about 3,000 dancers from hundreds of tribes in the U.S., Canada and Mexico. It routinely draws at least 80,000 visitors.

The event that opens Thursday in Albuquerque is intended to be nonpolitical, but Larry Yazzie, its official announcer, said people will be reminded why they are coming together, and that the "water protectors" - those who joined the pipeline protests - will be acknowledged.

"There will be plenty of people there who have been to North Dakota," Yazzie said. "The spirit will be there."

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) – The owners of four Nebraska beer stores that sell millions of cans of beer each year near a South Dakota American Indian reservation that is plagued by alcohol-related problems are appealing a state regulator's decision not to renew their liquor licenses.

The appeal filed late Monday in Lancaster County District Court says the Nebraska Liquor Control Commission's decision last week was arbitrary, unsupported by evidence and contrary to Nebraska law. The commission cited concerns about a lack of adequate law enforcement near the stores in the village of Whiteclay, 360 miles (580 kilometers) northwest of Omaha.

RAPID CITY, S.D. (AP) – Federal officials in South Dakota have indicted 15 peopled for illegally trafficking eagles and other migratory birds after a two-year undercover operation potentially involving hundreds of birds.

U.S. Attorney Randy Seiler said on April 24 that officials expect “significant” additional federal charges in the case, which focused on trafficking of eagles and eagle parts and feathers for profit. Authorities said the case involves more than 100 eagles, a number that could climb as high as 250.

Seiler described one operation as basically a “chop-shop for eagles” in which eagle feathers were stuffed into garbage bags. He said it was clear that it was a moneymaking operation and that the feathers and eagle parts such as talons and beaks were treated as merchandise.

HELENA, Mont. (AP) – As high schools prepare for graduation ceremonies across Montana, Gov. Steve Bullock has signed a bill allowing Native American students to wear traditional regalia while marching to get their diplomas.

The bill signed Friday prohibits schools and government agencies from interfering with students who wish to wear eagle feathers, beads and other items of cultural significance.

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) – Authorities dropped nearly three dozen cases last month that stemmed from arrests of protesters against the Dakota Access crude oil pipeline, court records show.

The Bismarck Tribune reported Saturday that prosecutors and judges dropped the 33 misdemeanor cases while another 14 were resolved by guilty pleas. Most of the cases dropped last month related to criminal trespass charges from the late summer and fall.

“Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI” (Doubleday), by David Grann

The FBI burnished its reputation by gunning down Depression-era gangster John Dillinger and bringing to justice the kidnapper of Charles Lindbergh’s baby. However, a more challenging but long forgotten investigation a decade earlier gave the fledgling agency its first major success.

At least two dozen and perhaps as many as several hundred Osage Indians were murdered during what became known as a yearslong “Reign of Terror.” The shocking episode that unfolded on the high-grass prairie during the 1920s was fueled by oil wealth, greed and prejudice.